What we're asking in housing

Do supportive services improve housing and quality-of-life outcomes for chronically homeless individuals?

More than half a million people in the U.S. are experiencing homelessness. While rates of homelessness continue to decline, lack of safe and sustainable housing remains a serious public health issue. In addition to housing-related financial support (e.g., employment assistance, Housing First programs, targeted rental/housing subsidies), chronically homeless individuals living with mental or substance use issues may need treatment, case management, and discharge planning services. 


PRG has conducted three evaluations of housing and supportive services programs in New Orleans –  to assess changes in housing stability, substance use, and mental health after program participation.

Housing First

This brief describes results from implementation and outcome evaluations of two programs designed to serve chronically homeless individuals in New Orleans through a Housing First approach. Both were designed by UNITY of Greater New Orleans and were funded by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s (SAMHSA) Cooperative Agreement to Benefit Homeless Individuals (CABHI).

 + Full evaluation brief

New Day Program

Supported by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s (SAMHSA) Cooperative Agreement to Benefit Homeless Individuals (CABHI), the New Day Program aimed to reduce chronic homelessness in New Orleans, Louisiana by providing permanent housing and supportive services to chronically homeless individuals. As part of the evaluation of the effect of the program, PRG conducted a qualitative study using data collected in interviews with the New Day Program staff.

+Full Report